Tags

, , , , , ,

This screen grab on July 12, 2016 shows a militant firing a US-made TOW missile toward Syrian soldiers positioned on Aleppo's city hall’s rooftop, which is located in a government-held neighborhood. (Photo by AFP)
This screen grab on July 12, 2016 shows a militant firing a US-made TOW missile toward Syrian soldiers positioned on Aleppo’s city hall’s rooftop, which is located in a government-held neighbourhood. (Photo by AFP)

Militants in Syria say they are about to receive new types of heavy weapons from their foreign supporters as the Damascus government continues with a major offensive in the northern city of Aleppo.

Colonel Fares al-Bayoush, head of the Northern Division of the so-called Free Syrian Army (FSA) militant group, said Saturday that he expected the delivery of more “heavy weapons, such as rocket launchers and artillery” from their foreign sponsors, Reuters reported.

He, however, said it was not clear whether their supporters would agree to their long-held demand for anti-aircraft missiles.

There are “indications and promises” of more weapons, the militant leader said, but claimed that any increase in arms support for them would be “slight.”

The United States, along with Saudi Arabia and Turkey, has been channeling military support to militants fighting under the banner of the FSA for several years.

The support for the militants described by Washington as “moderate” includes training by the Central Intelligence Agency and anti-tank missiles.

This comes as the Syrian army has been advancing further in militant-held areas, recapturing more regions.

On Saturday, Syrian soldiers seized back the control of a refugee camp north of Aleppo from militants.

Sources belonging to both the Syrian military and the militants confirmed the recapture of Handarat camp.

On September 19, the Syrian army announced an end to a week-long ceasefire in the Arab country, when US-led coalition jets attacked a Syrian army base and an aid convoy was hit near the northwestern Syrian city of Aleppo.

The deal, which began on September 12 and was initially agreed to last seven days, called for increased humanitarian aid for those trapped inside Aleppo. The truce was brokered by Russia and the US.

Syria has been gripped by foreign-backed militancy since March 2011.

Over the past few months, the Takfiri militants active in the Arab country have suffered major setbacks as the Syrian army has managed to liberate several areas.

source